Testing Week Scotland 11-17 September 2017 »

… injected drugs (including performance or image enhancing drugs) you may have been at risk of hepatitis C

Treat

Once you know about an infection, treatment means you can do something about it

Today in Scotland a person living with HIV can live a long, healthy life, hepatitis C can be cured, and effective treatments are also available for a whole range of STIs

Prevent

Staying on top of your sexual health means you can be confident about sex

Condoms and lube can …

Hepatitis A Information »

What is Hepatitis A ?

It is an infection caused by the hepatitis A virus leading to inflammation of the liver. The infection is usually short lived and while the symptoms can be unpleasant, it is rarely serious.

Hepatitis A key facts

Hepatitis A is a viral infection which leads to inflammation of the liver and can cause mild to severe illness.

The symptoms are generally a flu -like …

New HIV Self Testing Kits »

… testing for other infections, should you need them http://www.lanarkshiresexualhealth.org/hiv- hepatitis /hivclinics/hiv-clinics/  

Click here for more information: http://www.lanarkshiresexualhealth.org/hiv-hepatitis/hiv-and- aids /the-hiv-test/

World Aids Day »

… and put a stop to stigma and discrimination. They can be viewed here: http://www.lanarkshirehivandhepatitis.org/living-with-hiv-and-or- hepatitis /your-stories/hiv-stories.html

More information on HIV and AIDS:

Lanarkshire Activities

If you are interested in taking part in activities for 2016 please get in touch via the ‘contact us’ page.

Get in the know

For more information on HIV and AIDS, click here.  For confidential discussion, testing and …

Safer Sexual Health »

… 0300 303 0251 (Line open Monday to Friday 9.00 a.m. to 4.45 p.m.)

Lanarkshire HIV, AIDS and Hepatitis Centre (LHAHC), Monklands Hospital -call 01236 712247 (24 hour service – calls answered or taken by answerphone)

Useful Helplines

National Sexual Health Line :  0800 567 123

LGBT Helpline Scotland : 0300 123 2523 (Line open Tuesday and Wednesday 12 noon to 9 pm) or go to www.lgbthealth.org.uk

Terrence Higgins Trust : 0808 802 1221 (Line open Monday to …

The Folder »

… people who have been diagnosed HIV positive and who are attending the Lanarkshire HIV, AIDS and Hepatitis Centre (LHAHC).

Click here for more information

 

Syphilis »

… the baby. Pregnant women are routinely offered syphilis testing along with tests for HIV , Hepatitis B and Rubella.

If I test positive for syphilis, does my partner need to be tested?

Yes, if you test positive, it is important that your partner(s) is/are tested too so that they can also be treated, if required.

How can I best prevent infection?

The best way to stay free from sexually transmitted infections is to practice safer sex. HIV is a sexually transmitted …

HIV & Hepatitis Clinics »

… clinic in Lanarkshire takes place on a Tuesday afternoon at the Lanarkshire HIV, AIDS & Hepatitis Service (LHAHS), Monklands Hospital.

The clinic is provided by specialist doctors and nurses who are trained in HIV management. For HIV testing, appointments can generally be more flexible. The secretaries will try to give you an appointment time that suits you.

Once someone is tested and diagnosed positive with Hepatitis B, C or HIV  they will be referred to the specialist …

What is Hepatitis C? »

 A brief history of viral hepatitis

Several different viruses can cause hepatitis. The most common are hepatitis A, B and C. These viruses pass from person to person through different means, cause damage to the liver in different ways and have different effects on your health.

All of these viruses can cause an acute (short-term) disease, with symptoms lasting several weeks – including yellowing of the skin …

Prevention »

Prevention is better than cure. If you do not have one of the viruses that cause hepatitis then there are ways you can minimise the risk of contracting one. If you do have one of them then you may want to reduce the risk to those around you. Some of this section may apply to you. Please use it as a reference.

Breastfeeding

Theoretically, there is a risk of passing hepatitis C if the mother has cracked and bleeding nipples. However, breastfeeding is generally …

Treatment »

… all in one go, but will be done over the next few appointments.

What is the treatment for hepatitis C ?

Treatment currently available for hepatitis C works by helping the body to clear the virus. A combination of weekly injections with Interferon, together with daily Ribauirin tablets taken by mouth, is currently the ‘gold standard’ treatment.  Treatment is given for between 6 and 12 months.  Depending on the strain or ‘genotype’ of the virus that you have got, such …

What is Hepatitis B? »

A brief history of viral hepatitis

Several different viruses can cause hepatitis. The most common are hepatitis A, B and C. These viruses pass from person to person through different means, cause damage to the liver in different ways and have different effects on your health.

All of these viruses can cause an acute (short-term) disease, with symptoms lasting several weeks – including yellowing of the skin …

Prevention »

Prevention is better than cure. If you do not have one of the viruses that cause hepatitis then there are ways you can minimise the risk of contracting one. If you do have one of them then you may want to reduce the risk to those around you. Some of this section may apply to you. Please use it as a reference.

Pregnancy and Breastfeeding

In the UK, all pregnant women are tested for hepatitis B and, if they have the virus, their babies are vaccinated soon after …

Vaccination and Treatment »

… from a previous infection that they did not know about. This can be checked by a blood test.

Hepatitis B vaccine

To have full protection from hepatitis B you need three or four  separate doses of the vaccine. A nurse will probably give you the injection into a muscle in your arm. The first injection is usually followed by one a month later and another at six months. In some circumstances you can receive a rapid course of injections over one month. It is important that you …

Support Groups »

… The group is run by staff from Terrence Higgins Trust and the Lanarkshire HIV, AIDS and Hepatitis Centre (LHAHC). For more information on when and where it takes place please contact either Chris Kimber at Terrence Higgins Trust on 0141 332 3838 or email chris.kimber@tht.org.uk, or Liz McCann at the LHAHC on 01236 712 247.

A support group for anyone living with HIV held on the third Tuesday of each month.

The group is run by staff from The Princess Royal Trust …

The HIV Test »

… positive or negative.

You can arrange an HIV antibody test at the Lanarkshire HIV, AIDS and Hepatitis centre or at any Genitourinary Medicine clinic.  Your GP can usually also arrange for an HIV test.  These tests are completely free and confidential.

When you take the test, a nurse will take a small sample of your blood which is then sent to the laboratory for testing. You may also be asked if you want a full sexually transmitted infection screen.  It is up to you to decide if …

If the Test is Negative »

… more information.

For more information you could contact the

Lanarkshire HIV, AIDS & Hepatitis Centre

t: 01236 712247 / 712246

Anus and Rectum »

… which are outlined in detail elsewhere on this site under the headings of HIV - AIDS - Hepatitis and Infections. It is useful to make yourself aware of the dangers involved upon becoming infected, and take the precautions outlined in the Safer Sex section of the site. It is safer to use a condom for penetrative anal sex, one that is designed to be strong enough for this activity like Durex Ultra Strong, Mates Super Strong or HT Specials. These work better with a water-based …

Illicit Drugs »

… carries a high risk of contracting a number of serious infections /viruses including HIV and Hepatitis C.  What some people don’t realise is that the risk is not just limited to injecting equipment, but can also be passed through the paraphernalia that is used to sniff drugs.  Infection can be passed through bank notes or straws that are used to sniff drugs, but also through water, cups and spoons.  To keep you safe, never share equipment used to take drugs.

Heroin

Heroin can …