Early Signs and Symptoms of Pregnancy »

… test from the first day after a missed period.

Pregnancy tests work by detecting a pregnancy hormone called: Hormone Chorionic Gonadotrophin (HCG) in your urine.  You can do a test any time of the day or night. A positive pregnancy test is almost certainly correct but a negative test is less reliable.

Different pregnancy test kits work differently so it is important to follow the instructions for your particular kit carefully.   If your period doesn’t arrive and you think you may …

Arousal »

… ability to become aroused may be impaired for a number of reasons such as;

Imbalanced Hormone levels, particularly with regard to Testosterone which is believed to figure significantly in arousal in both men and women.

A reduction in response capability induced by the natural ageing process.

Illness, surgery or injury which results in significant pain, fatigue, disfigurement, etc.

Medication used in the treatment of illness.

Misuse of …

Other Methods of Contraception »

… you to take a pill every day for 3 weeks and then have a week free. These pills contain two hormones oestrogen and progestogen.

The main method of action of these pills is to prevent you releasing an egg. If taken correctly the combined pill has a very low failure rate. Prior to being given a combined pill you would be assessed by a nurse or doctor, have your blood pressure checked, and a medical history taken, to check that you have no risk factors for complications with the …

Long Acting Reversible Contraceptive Methods (LARC) »

… inserted you are able to feel it but it is not visible. This little rod produces a low dose of hormone slowly releasing it into the tissue below your skin. This stops you ovulating (releasing an egg). It also alters the cervical mucus. Almost everybody can have this method of contraception and is has an extremely low failure rate. This method of contraception once in your arm can stay in for 3 years. The insertion of the implant involves a small amount of local anaesthetic in your arm …

Menopause »

… section of this web site.

The most common treatment for post-menopausal difficulties is Hormone replacement therapy (HRT), the main aim of which is to replace the oestrogen now no longer available. As with any treatment, there seem to be both advantages and disadvantages. The possible advantages include a reduction in urinary incontinence, a reduction of infections and  a reduction in vaginal irritation. In the longer term, osteoporosis may be reduced and some protection provided …

Sexual Feelings »

… ready to have sex long before our minds are. This can be really difficult if your body is full of hormones shouting “I wanna do that!” but you’re not feeling ready for it emotionally. And then of course, young people can often go around casually telling each other lies about having such a lot of sex and how great it is because they think that’s what’s expected of them. A lot of the time this is just bravado but sadly, some people feel really pressured into having sex they are not …

Andropause »

… Menopause, except that it does not directly end fertility.

In men, the production of the hormone Testosterone gradually decreases from about age 60. This has generally been accepted as a part of a normal ageing process and it is usually without notable impact on their physical condition.

It has been argued by some however, that there can be a significant reduction in the level of ‘free’ testosterone in quite young men – from 35 – 50 years of age – as well as older men …

Your Prostate »

… extent, and as many as 80% of those over 80. It is believed to be caused by the effect of male hormones and the ageing process and may be an inherited condition. Difficulties with Urinating are the main Symptom, but it can be associated with Urinary tract Infections (UTIs) and kidney damage if left untreated. Accurate diagnosis can only be made by medical examination so go to your GP if you notice any problems urinating.

Treatment

Mild cases should be monitored for change …

Trans »

… sex to that recorded at their birth.

They can also undergo medical treatment (including hormone therapy) and surgery to adjust their physical characteristics to that of their chosen gender. This gender reassignment can be a lengthy process, and involves a lot of consultation with medical professionals.

An individual usually has 1 year of counselling and hormone treatment, and then a further year of the “real-life test”, where they live as a member of the opposite sex.

The …

Prostate Cancer »

… extent, and as many as 80% of those over 80. It is believed to be caused by the effect of male hormones and the ageing process and may be an inherited condition. Difficulties with Urinating are the main Symptom , but it can be associated with Urinary tract Infections (UTIs) and kidney damage if left untreated. Accurate diagnosis can only be made by medical examination so go to your GP if you notice any problems Urinating.

Treatment

Mild cases should be monitored for …

Ovarian Cancer »

… to the attention of your doctor.

Given that pregnancy, the use of contraception or the use of hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) seems to provide some level of long term protection against the disease, consideration might be given by your doctor to providing oral contraception or HRT as a preventative measure in such cases.

Where there is felt to be a high risk of developing the condition, consideration might be given to the removal of the ovaries as a preventative measure. This may be …

Uterine / Endometrial Cancer »

… frequent among postmenopausal women, and is rare under the age of 35. The use of oestrogen -only hormone replacement therapy (HRT) increases the risk, as does an early start with menstruation and late age of menopause.

Preventative action

Unlike cervical cancer, there is no regular screening for uterine cancer in all women. Although, an abnormal smear test for cervical cancer may provide some indication of a problem. Given the cancer’s association with increased exposure …