Hepatitis A Information »

What is Hepatitis A ?

It is an infection caused by the hepatitis A virus leading to inflammation of the liver. The infection is usually short lived and while the symptoms can be unpleasant, it is rarely serious.

Hepatitis A key facts

Hepatitis A is a viral infection which leads to inflammation of the liver and can cause mild to severe illness.

The symptoms are generally a flu -like illness, loss of appetite, nausea, fever, abdominal pains or …

Viral Load »

… are undetectable. Even if your viral load does become undetectable, this does not mean that the virus has been eradicated from your body, but that its level has been greatly reduced and disease progression slowed down or stopped.

Your blood should be tested regularly (about every 3-6 months) to check both CD4 cells and viral load. If there are any sudden changes, unexpected results or ‘blips’ a second test should be taken much sooner. If you start or change anti-HIV therapy you …

Combination Therapy »

… in turn help to ensure that the medication provides complete and durable suppression of the HIV Virus – as long as your treatment Adherence is good.

Detail

HIV drugs are generally classed according to the way they stop the virus from reproducing itself.  There are now six main types of drugs used to combat HIV:

Nucleoside analogue reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs).  These target an HIV protein called ‘reverse transcriptase’

Non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase …

C Card Scheme »

… C Card scheme and to find out where your nearest C Card centre is, please call the Blood Borne Virus and Sexual Health Promotion Team on 01698 377623.

Genital Warts »

What are genital warts?

Genital warts are caused by a virus called Human Papilloma virus. The virus affects the skin of the penis, vagina and anus. It can cause warts, which are like those that grow on other parts of the body. Don’t panic if you have genital warts – they are very common.

What are the symptoms ?

Often the warts are small and very difficult to see – you may not even know you have them. The warts are small, fleshy …

Herpes »

What is herpes?

Herpes is caused by a virus called Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV). There are two types of herpes virus, which tend to affect different areas of the body:

Type one…

causes cold sores around the mouth. It is very common, and most people catch it when they are children, often through kissing. It is also an increasing cause of genital herpes.

Type two…

causes genital herpes but can very rarely cause oral …

I have cold sores »

Cold sores are a very common condition, caused by a type of the herpes virus .

People can contract cold sores around their mouth but also on the genitals . The vast majority of people have this type of virus in their body, having picked it up during childhood (it is passed on by skin to skin contact with someone with the virus: usually by kissing). Cold sores usually begin with a tingling feeling on the lip, and then turn into a blister or sore. These usually …

What is Hepatitis C? »

 A brief history of viral hepatitis

Several different viruses can cause hepatitis. The most common are hepatitis A, B and C. These viruses pass from person to person through different means, cause damage to the liver in different ways and have different effects on your health.

All of these viruses can cause an acute (short-term) disease, with symptoms lasting several weeks – including yellowing of the skin and eyes (jaundice), dark urine, …

Prevention »

Prevention is better than cure. If you do not have one of the viruses that cause hepatitis then there are ways you can minimise the risk of contracting one. If you do have one of them then you may want to reduce the risk to those around you. Some of this section may apply to you. Please use it as a reference.

Breastfeeding

Theoretically, there is a risk of passing hepatitis C if the mother has cracked and bleeding nipples. However, breastfeeding …

Treatment »

… C ?

Treatment currently available for hepatitis C works by helping the body to clear the virus. A combination of weekly injections with Interferon, together with daily Ribauirin tablets taken by mouth, is currently the ‘gold standard’ treatment.  Treatment is given for between 6 and 12 months.  Depending on the strain or ‘genotype’ of the virus that you have got, such treatment will typically result in the virus being cleared from the system in 50% – 75% of patients.  …

What is Hepatitis B? »

A brief history of viral hepatitis

Several different viruses can cause hepatitis. The most common are hepatitis A, B and C. These viruses pass from person to person through different means, cause damage to the liver in different ways and have different effects on your health.

All of these viruses can cause an acute (short-term) disease, with symptoms lasting several weeks – including yellowing of the skin and eyes (jaundice), dark urine, …

Prevention »

Prevention is better than cure. If you do not have one of the viruses that cause hepatitis then there are ways you can minimise the risk of contracting one. If you do have one of them then you may want to reduce the risk to those around you. Some of this section may apply to you. Please use it as a reference.

Pregnancy and Breastfeeding

In the UK, all pregnant women are tested for hepatitis B and, if they have the virus, their babies are …

Vaccination and Treatment »

… will eventually recover. If this happens, you will have acquired life-long protection against the virus.

Treatment for people with chronic hepatitis B

If you have hepatitis B for more than six months you may benefit from treatment. You will need to see a specialist regularly to detect any damage to your liver. If your liver function test shows results your specialist is concerned about, you may be offered treatment for your hepatitis B.  In Lanarkshire, treatment for hepatitis B …

Resistance Testing »

… routinely.  Resistance testing shows whether or not a given drug is effective against your HIV virus.  It may tell you whether you have been infected with a drug-resistant strain of HIV, and also if you are resistant to  drugs you are currently taking, or have taken in the past and then initially start to benefit from these medications.  Resistance is the ability of HIV to overcome the effects of anti-HIV medication.  The best way to avoid drug resistance developing is to make sure …

Just Ask »

… engage in high risk behaviour.  

To register with the scheme, contact the Blood Borne Virus and Sexual Health Promotion Team on:  01698 377623

Illicit Drugs »

… syringes and other equipment carries a high risk of contracting a number of serious infections /viruses including HIV and Hepatitis C.  What some people don’t realise is that the risk is not just limited to injecting equipment, but can also be passed through the paraphernalia that is used to sniff drugs.  Infection can be passed through bank notes or straws that are used to sniff drugs, but also through water, cups and spoons.  To keep you safe, never share equipment used to take …